Are carpet cleaning chemicals dangerous?

Carpet cleaning chemicals certainly have the potential to damage carpet, either because they are the wrong chemical for the type of carpet or stain, because they leave residues, or because optical bleaches are used that damage the carpet over time. That's why it's so important to make sure you're using the right chemicals (more on that later).

Are carpet cleaning chemicals dangerous?

Carpet cleaning chemicals certainly have the potential to damage carpet, either because they are the wrong chemical for the type of carpet or stain, because they leave residues, or because optical bleaches are used that damage the carpet over time. That's why it's so important to make sure you're using the right chemicals (more on that later). Overall, carpet cleaning chemicals are very safe when you entrust your cleaning to a reputable and established carpet cleaning company. That said, there are some carpet cleaners that sacrifice safety to save a few dollars; not all cleaning products are environmentally friendly and non-toxic.

If you're in doubt, be sure to ask your carpet cleaner what they're using on your carpet. OSHA requires chemical manufacturers to produce a safety data sheet for each cleaning product they manufacture, and an accredited cleaner will have an SDS for every cleaning product they have. In a nutshell, a safety data sheet or SDS will refer to the composition of the chemical, the hazards it poses and how to administer first aid, if necessary. Most carpet cleaners use a toxic soup that leaves hazardous fumes and residues that can seriously affect your family's health.

Some of the commonly used products contain perchloroethylene, a popular dry-cleaning chemical known to cause nausea, dizziness, and fatigue. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also warns of possible liver and kidney damage. Naphthalene is another popular solvent used to dissolve dirt accumulated on carpets. It is made from coal tar and is considered dangerous to the human central nervous system and is potentially carcinogenic.

Some of the solvents used for dry carpet cleaning contain butyloxyethanol, which can cause damage to the liver, central nervous system and kidneys. Here's what you need to know about the chemicals used to clean your carpet and help you make the best decision to protect your environment and your carpet. Many traditional carpet cleaning products use toxic chemical ingredients similar to those used by commercial dry cleaners. While you don't need to become a chemical expert to clean carpets, it's definitely good practice to ask a few questions and find out exactly what your carpet cleaning equipment is using and why (if they can't tell you why, that's an immediate warning sign).

I've had several times when I discovered the hard way that a rug didn't react well to a chemical I was using. In addition to answering the main question, we'll look at why it's important to clean carpets, how often you should clean them, and the professional cleaning process. This is because carbonation allows them to use less water, so carpets don't get soaked. However, as dirt builds up over time, it makes it difficult for carpets to keep it out of the air.

To replace traditional carpet detergents, create a non-toxic cleaner combining baking soda, water and Castile soap. It was an unexpected and very serious reaction to the chemical compounds in the cleaning liquid I was using to clean my carpet. When spraying a cleaning solution containing these chemical compounds, toxic and misty particles flow into the air, where they are easy to inhale. Old-fashioned home cleaners, such as baking soda, vinegar and water, or even toothpaste, are being used again.

However, cleaning products with formaldehyde, glycol ethers, ammonia, bleach and chlorine could be ticking bombs for family members and pets. Ask friends or family for recommendations, or at least ask a potential cleaner what type of chemicals they're using. We also follow the current standards set by the Institute for Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) to ensure a safe environment for your children and pets. Even if you use a magnifying glass, you may not find many of these names on the labels of your house cleaners because, as we said, the government doesn't require most of them to appear on the list.

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